Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Colo. marry-a-foreign-terrorist woman admits aiding foreign terrorist cell

Do you still believe in Islam ~ yes and I believe Islam is peaceful!!


Paulin-Ramirez arrived in Ireland on Sept. 11, 2009, and married an Algerian terrorism suspect the same day. Defense lawyer Jeremy Ibrahim called her a sincere religious convert who married "for the love of Islam, not for the love of her husband."

She marries a terrorist on the same day as the biggest terrorist attack in the US ~ that's a conversion for you!!


PHILADELPHIA -AP- A Colorado woman has admitted she conspired to help a terrorist cell that sought to train with al-Qaida-linked group and incite an Islamic holy war.

U.S. prosecutors say 32-year-old Jamie Paulin-Ramirez of Leadville, Colo., conspired with others to get military training in South Asia and moved to Ireland in 2009 to join the group.

Court papers released Tuesday show the Algerian man she married there sought to recruit "brothers & sisters" to train with the group known as al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb.

Paulin-Ramirez faces up to 15 years in prison after her guilty plea Tuesday to conspiring to aid foreign terrorists.

Federal prosecutors say she joined forces with Colleen LaRose of Pennsylvania, who dubbed herself "Jihad Jane" online.

Defense lawyer Jeremy Ibrahim says Paulin-Ramirez got caught up in something larger than she knew.

Story told another was ~ by AP

A woman described as a troubled single mother will plead guilty to a terrorism conspiracy charge Tuesday, her lawyer said, becoming the rare American-born woman to admit plotting with foreign terrorists.

Jamie Paulin-Ramirez, 32, of Leadville, Colo., faces up to 15 years in prison. An April indictment charges that she accepted an invitation from co-defendant Colleen LaRose to move to Ireland to help work toward a Muslim holy war.

Paulin-Ramirez arrived in Ireland on Sept. 11, 2009, and married an Algerian terrorism suspect the same day. Defense lawyer Jeremy Ibrahim called her a sincere religious convert who married "for the love of Islam, not for the love of her husband."
Paulin-Ramirez voluntarily returned to the U.S. after she, her husband and others were detained in Ireland in March 2010 as part of a global terror plot.

LaRose, 47, of Pennsburg, had spent years caring for her boyfriend's father in Pennsylvania while building a double life online as "Jihad Jane." She admitted last month that she had agreed to kill Swedish cartoonist Lars Vilks, whose work had offended Muslims.

LaRose faces a possible life sentence after her plea to conspiring to kill a foreign target and three other charges.

Paulin-Ramirez, by contrast, is charged with a single conspiracy count. She could be found guilty of the charge for simply providing food or lodging to a terror suspect, Ibrahim said Tuesday.

"She ended up being part of something that was much larger, much more complex than she ever knew," Ibrahim told The Associated Press.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer Arbittier Williams did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

Paulin-Ramirez was pregnant when she first appeared in court in the U.S., but has since lost the pregnancy, Ibrahim said.

"You're dealing with a 32-year-old single mom from a small town in Colorado," Ibrahim said. "This has been an extremely stressful and overwhelming situation ... that's impacted her physical well-being."

She also has a young son who was taken into protective custody when she arrived in Philadelphia, where FBI agents had opened the LaRose investigation, to face arrest.

Paulin-Ramirez's mother has described her in the past as a troubled single mother who had the "mentality of an abused woman."

There is no evidence from court documents that LaRose ever made it to Sweden to kill Vilks, whose 2007 depiction of the Prophet Muhammad prompted threats, although the indictment said she followed his activities online.

LaRose returned to Philadelphia in October 2009 to surrender, becoming one of the few women ever charged in the U.S. with terrorist activities.

LaRose's arrest was kept secret and the indictment unsealed only after Paulin-Ramirez and the six others were arrested months later.

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