Friday, October 15, 2010

Wilders warns new cabinet on 'non-western' immigration, namely family reunifications

Netherlands' Prime Minister Mark Rutte (L) arrives at The Treve Hall at the Dutch Parliament with outgoing Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende for the passing over of power in The Hague October 14, 2010.

The family reunification laws if allowed to continue could mean exponential immigration growth. Not the controlled or selective immigration needed to help Holland grow.


The new cabinet will have a problem if it does not reduce the number of non-western immigrants to the Netherlands, PVV leader Geert Wilders told tv current affairs show Nieuwsuur on Thursday evening.

Wilders’anti-Islam PVV party has agreed to prop up the new minority coalition government in return for tough measures to combat immigration.

‘If it does not manage to bring about a very substantial reduction in the number of non-western immigrants, the PVV has a problem and the cabinet has a problem,’ Wilders said.

Minister

New immigration minister Gerd Leers, who has criticised Wilders in the past, does not agree with all the PVV says but is committed to carrying out the coalition agreement, Wilders said.

Earlier, PVV European MP Barry Madlener told Nos tv the aim of anti-immigration measures outlined in the new government agreement is to combat the ‘islamisation’ of the Netherlands.

Madlener was Geert Wilders’ right hand during the recent negotiations. Measures to reduce family reunions are aimed at reducing the number of Muslims coming to the country, Madlener said. ‘That is our intention,’ he told the tv programme.

European policy

And it is not unrealistic to expect shifts in European policy that will make this possible, he said. For example, Rutte could form a conservative alliance with French president Nicolas Sarkozy and Italy’s prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, the MEP said.

Several of the measures in the coalition agreement would involve changing EU treaties.

Prime minister Mark Rutte told his first news conference that the VVD, CDA and PVV all have different arguments in favour of government policy. ‘We differ on this with the PVV. That is why the PVV is not part of the government,’ he was reported as saying.

Dutch News

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