Friday, September 24, 2010

Pakistan ablaze with US flags 'this time' over Lady Al Qaeda's jail sentence [Photos]


Pakistani activists of Pasban, the youth wing of Sunni Muslim party torch the US flag during a protest in Karachi on September 23, 2010.





Pakistani protesters shout anti-American slogans during a rally to condemn the verdict against alleged Al-Qaida suspect Aafia Siddiqui in Islamabad, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010.

A Pakistani student reacts over the verdict against alleged Al-Qaida suspect Aafia Siddiqui near the U. S. Consulate in Lahore, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010. Siddiqui , a U.S.- trained Pakistani scientist convicted of trying to kill U.S. agents and military officers in Afghanistan, was sentenced Thursday to 86 years in prison.

A Pakistani student reacts over the verdict against alleged Al-Qaida suspect Aafia Siddiqui near the U. S. Consulate in Lahore, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010.

Student ~ if you are a student ~ we have a visa!!!

Pakistani activists of the hardline party Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) shout anti-US slogans and burn tires during a protest in Lahore early on September 24, 2010 following the sentencing of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui to 86 years in prison for trying to shoot US officers. A New York court found Aafia Siddiqui, 38, who had been dubbed 'Lady Qaeda' by the US tabloids, guilty for attempted murder of US officers in Afghanistan, in a high-profile case sparking outrage in Pakistan.

Pakistani activists of the hardline party Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) shout anti-US slogans and burn tires during a protest in Lahore early on September 24, 2010 following the sentencing of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui to 86 years in prison for trying to shoot US officers.

Pakistani activists of the hardline party Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) shout anti-US slogans and burn tires during a protest in Lahore early on September 24, 2010 following the sentencing of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui to 86 years in prison for trying to shoot US officers. A New York court found Aafia Siddiqui, 38, who had been dubbed 'Lady Qaeda' by the US tabloids, guilty for attempted murder of US officers in Afghanistan, in a high-profile case sparking outrage in Pakistan.

Pakistani activists of the hardline party Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) shout anti-US slogans and burn tires during a protest in Lahore early on September 24, 2010 following the sentencing of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui to 86 years in prison for trying to shoot US officers. A New York court found Aafia Siddiqui, 38, who had been dubbed 'Lady Qaeda' by the US tabloids, guilty for attempted murder of US officers in Afghanistan, in a high-profile case sparking outrage in Pakistan.

A Pakistani student throws tear gas shell toward police who tried to disperse crowd gathered to condemn the verdict against alleged al-Qaida  suspect Aafia Siddiqui in Karachi, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010. Siddiqui, a U.S.-trained Pakistani scientist convicted of trying to kill U.S. agents and military officers in Afghanistan, was sentenced Thursday to 86 years in prison.

Pakistani student throws tear gas shell toward police who tried to disperse crowd gathered to condemn the verdict against alleged al-Qaida suspect Aafia Siddiqui in Karachi, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010.

Another student ~ VISA!!

Pakistani activists of the hardline party Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) disperse as police fire teargas during an anti-US protest in Karachi on September 24, 2010, following the sentencing of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui to 86 years in prison for trying to shoot US officers. Pakistan said on September 24 it would petition the United States to repatriate a Pakistani mother of three sentenced to 86 years in jail for attempted murder whose fate sparked furious protests. A New York court found Aafia Siddiqui, the once brilliant scientist dubbed 'Lady Qaeda' by the US tabloids, guilty of the attempted murder of US military officers in Afghanistan in a case that sparked outrage in Pakistan.

Pakistani activists of the hardline party Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) disperse as police fire teargas during an anti-US protest in Karachi on September 24, 2010.

Pakistani activists of the hardline party Jamaat-i-Islami (JI) carry photographs of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui as they shout slogans while they march toward the US embassy during an anti-US protest in Islamabad on September 24, 2010 following the sentencing of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui to 86 years in prison for trying to shoot US officers. Pakistan said on September 24 it would petition the United States to repatriate a Pakistani mother of three sentenced to 86 years in jail for attempted murder whose fate sparked furious protests. A New York court found Aafia Siddiqui, the once brilliant scientist dubbed 'Lady Qaeda' by the US tabloids, guilty of the attempted murder of US military officers in Afghanistan in a case that sparked outrage in Pakistan.

Tear gas is fired by police at activists of the Pakistani religious political party Jamaat-e-Islami as they march towards the U.S. consulate during a protest rally in Karachi September 24, 2010, to condemn the verdict against scientist Aafia Siddiqui. Pakistan vowed on Friday to repatriate Siddiqui who was sentenced to an effective life term in the United States as hundreds of people protested against the ruling, denouncing their government and its ally Washington. Many in Pakistan, a key U.S. ally in the war against militants and where anti-U.S. sentiment also run high, believe Aafia Siddiqui, a 38-year-old neuroscientist, is innocent.

Tear gas is fired by police at activists of the Pakistani religious political party Jamaat-e-Islami as they march towards the U.S. consulate during a protest rally in Karachi September 24, 2010.

A supporter of the Pakistani religious political party Jamaat-e-Islami holds up copy of the Koran during an anti-U.S. protest rally in Peshawar September 24, 2010. Hundreds gathered to condemn the verdict by a U.S. judge against Pakistani neuroscientist Aafia Siddiqui and plans by a U.S. pastor to burn the Koran on the anniversary of the September 11 attacks, which were dropped. Siddiqui was handed a life term of 86 years on Thursday after being convicted for shooting at FBI agents and soldiers after her arrest in Afghanistan.

A supporter of the Pakistani religious political party Jamaat-e-Islami holds up copy of the Koran during an anti-U.S. protest rally in Peshawar September 24, 2010.

Jamaat-e-Islami ~ closely affiliated with the largest Muslim org. in the UK Muslim Council of Britain.

A supporter of the Pakistani religious political party Jamaat-e-Islami holds up copy of the Koran during an anti-American protest rally in Pakistan's restive northwest city Peshawar September 24, 2010. Hundreds gathered to condemn the verdict by a U.S. judge against Pakistani neuroscientist Aafia Siddiqui and plans by a U.S. pastor to burn the Koran on the anniversary of the September 11 attacks, which were dropped. Siddiqui was handed a life term of 86 years on Thursday after being convicted for shooting at FBI agents and soldiers after her arrest in Afghanistan.

A supporter of the Pakistani religious political party Jamaat-e-Islami holds the Koran during a protest rally in Karachi September 24, 2010, to condemn the verdict against scientist Aafia Siddiqui. Pakistan vowed on Friday to repatriate Siddiqui who was sentenced to an effective life term in the United States as hundreds of people protested against the ruling, denouncing their government and its ally Washington. Many in Pakistan, a key U.S. ally in the war against militants and where anti-U.S. sentiment also run high, believe Siddiqui, a 38-year-old neuroscientist, is innocent.

Is it something we said?

Pakistani supporters of hardline pro-Taliban party Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam-Nazaryati (JUI-N) torch a rug depicting the US flag during an anti-US protest rally in Quetta on September 24, 2010. Pakistani activists poured into the streets on September 24 shouting 'Death to America' and burning effigies of President Barack Obama after a US court jailed a woman scientist for 86 years. In a case that has been condemned across the nuclear-armed Muslim nation of 167 million, the government said it would petition Washington to secure the repatriation of the mother of three on humanitarian grounds. A New York court found Aafia Siddiqui, the once brilliant scientist dubbed 'Lady Qaeda' by the US tabloids, guilty of the attempted murder of US military officers in Afghanistan in 2008 -- five years after she disappeared.

Pakistani supporters of hardline pro-Taliban party Jamiat Ulema-i-Islam-Nazaryati (JUI-N) torch a rug depicting the US flag during an anti-US protest rally in Quetta on September 24, 2010.

A supporter of Pakistani religious party Jamat-e-Islami prays during a rally to condemn the verdict against alleged al-Qaida  suspect Aafia Siddiqui in Karachi, Pakistan, on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010. Siddiqui, a U.S.-trained Pakistani scientist convicted of trying to kill U.S. agents and military officers in Afghanistan, was sentenced Thursday to 86-years in prison.

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamat-e-Islami rally to condemn the verdict against alleged al-Qaida  suspect Aafia Siddiqui in Karachi, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010. Siddiqui, a U.S.-trained Pakistani scientist convicted of trying to kill U.S. agents and military officers in Afghanistan, was sentenced Thursday to 86 years in prison.

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamat-e-Islami rally to condemn the verdict against alleged al-Qaida  suspect Aafia Siddiqui and threats to burn the Quran by a small American church, in Peshawar, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010.

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamat-e-Islami rally to condemn the verdict against alleged al-Qaida suspect Aafia Siddiqui and threats to burn the Quran by a small American church, in Peshawar, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010.

Supporters of Pakistani religious party Jamat-e-Islami rally to condemn the verdict against alleged al-Qaida  suspect Aafia Siddiqui and threats to burn the Quran by a small American church, in Peshawar, Pakistan on Friday, Sept. 24, 2010.

Sister

Fowzia Siddiqui, sister of US detained Pakistani woman Aafia Siddiqui, leads an anti-US protest rally in Karachi on September 24, 2010, following the sentencing of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui to 86 years in prison for trying to shoot US officers. Pakistan said on September 24 it would petition the United States to repatriate a Pakistani mother of three sentenced to 86 years in jail for attempted murder whose fate sparked furious protests. A New York court found Aafia Siddiqui, the once brilliant scientist dubbed 'Lady Qaeda' by the US tabloids, guilty of the attempted murder of US military officers in Afghanistan in a case that sparked outrage in Pakistan.

Fowzia Siddiqui, sister of US detained Pakistani woman Aafia Siddiqui, leads an anti-US protest rally in Karachi on September 24, 2010.

Fowzia Siddiqui (L), sister of US detained Pakistani woman Aafia Siddiqui, arrives with her mother Ismat Siddiqui (R) for a news conference at their house in Karachi on September 23, 2010 following Aafia sentenced in US. The family of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui on September 23 vowed to launch a 'movement' to get her released from jail in America. A US federal court on September 23 sentenced a Pakistani woman scientist to 86 years in prison for the attempted murder of US officers in Afghanistan, in a high-profile case closely watched in Islamabad. Aafia Siddiqui, 38, a neuroscientist trained at the prestigious Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was found guilty in February of trying to kill American servicemen in Afghanistan.

Fowzia Siddiqui (L), sister of US detained Pakistani woman Aafia Siddiqui, arrives with her mother Ismat Siddiqui (R) for a news conference at their house in Karachi on September 23, 2010 following Aafia sentenced in US. The family of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui on September 23 vowed to launch a 'movement' to get her released from jail in America.

Ismat Siddiqui, mother of US detained Pakistani woman Aafia Siddiqui, speaks during a news conference at her house in Karachi on September 23, 2010 following Aafia sentenced in US. The family of Pakistani scientist Aafia Siddiqui on September 23 vowed to launch a 'movement' to get her released from jail in America. A US federal court on September 23 sentenced a Pakistani woman scientist to 86 years in prison for the attempted murder of US officers in Afghanistan, in a high-profile case closely watched in Islamabad. Aafia Siddiqui, 38, a neuroscientist trained at the prestigious Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was found guilty in February of trying to kill American servicemen in Afghanistan.

Ismat Siddiqui, mother of US detained Pakistani woman Aafia Siddiqui, speaks during a news conference at her house in Karachi on September 23, 2010 following Aafia sentenced in US.

Pakistani protesters rally near the U. S. Consulate to condemn the arrest of alleged Al-Qaida suspect Aafia Siddiqui on Thursday, Sept. 23, 2010 in Karachi, Pakistan. Siddiqui's strange legal odyssey began two summers ago in Afghanistan, where she turned up carrying evidence that _ depending on the argument _ proved she was either a terrorist or a lunatic.

Pakistani protesters rally near the U. S. Consulate to condemn the arrest of alleged Al-Qaida suspect Aafia Siddiqui on Thursday, Sept. 23, 2010 in Karachi, Pakistan.

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