Thursday, August 12, 2010

Tolerance at Ground Zero: To reciprocate, Imam Feisal should defend Christian minorities in the Middle East

Reciprocation ~ there is no Islamic translation!! Only 'All mine'

This is the idea behind the Dhimmi status. That non-Muslims should be so humiliated that they should desire to trade in their religion for Islam and along with it the award of full citizenship rights.

Not only Imam Feisal Rauf ~ but also those at CAIR and even CNN's Fareed Zakaria should be challenged on their believes about the Dhimmi status of non-Muslims in the Islamic world. Zakaria who so rudely gave back his award to the ADL ~ for their opposition to the Ground Zero mosque ~ should be asked to speak out just as vigorously against the second class or non-citizen status of non-Muslims across the Islamic world. They should offer clear and unequivocal support for equal rights and an end to the Apartheid system for non-Muslims in the Islamic world. Not so easy as handing back an award ~ this would be challengng Islamic law.


Reciprocity is the opposite of Islamization.


In 1995, the Saudis and others, with the Vatican's support, opened a large, beautiful mosque in Rome. The expectation was that the Saudis would loosen their restrictions on Christian practice. Despite some one million immigrant Christian workers there, the Saudis have done nothing.

Frustrated by the repeated failure of Islamic leaders to match promises with practice, Pope Benedict added to the Vatican's strategy of accommodation a one-word policy, which the tolerance advocates here should adopt: "reciprocity."

The idea: There will be support for fewer new mosques in the West until the home countries stop hammering non-Islamic religions. Until they reciprocate good will with good will.


Listen to shortened version here.

Daniel Henninger

If there is a silver lining in the fight over Manhattan's "Ground Zero Mosque," it is to see that the events of September 11, 2001 remain strong in the public mind.

Thus it is affirming, in an ironic way, to see partisans on the left and right joining to defend the legal and Constitutional right of Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf to build an Islamic center and mosque at 45 Park Place, two blocks from the perimeter of the former World Trade Center towers.

It will be an irony of a different sort if the $100 million Islamic center rises 13 stories while the new the World Trade Center site, nine years after, remains a pit of dust-covered construction struggling to rejoin the life of New York City. For the most extreme elements of Islam, this must seem a crude, enduring victory.

Recall the ringing cries that rebuilding the annihilated 108 stories would be the "best answer" to the terrorists. Absent that, the next-best answer New York City gave recently was to reassert its belief in freedom of religion and legal title. In an August 3 speech on the Islamic center's building approvals, New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg summarized those freedoms as "tolerance."

One must agree. This is tolerance.

Along the way, Mr. Bloomberg noted that denying someone the right to build a house of worship "may happen in other countries" but shouldn't here. There is a school of thought in this controversy that bringing up the denial of religious practice in "other countries" is irrelevant to discussing the appropriateness of the Ground Zero mosque. I disagree.

Indeed in the wake of much praise for Mayor Bloomberg's defense of civil and religious liberty, let me modestly suggest that he next go to Rome in October and deliver a sequel at Pope Benedict XVI's synod on what the pope recently called the "urgent" plight of Christian minorities in the Middle East. Here, Mr. Bloomberg was preaching to the choir. Try it over there, where it really matters.

We didn't discover tolerance. Islam coexisted for centuries with Christianity and Judaism. No more. Minorities such as Coptic Christians in Egypt or the Chaldeans and Yazidi in Iraq are being punished or driven out. Churches are destroyed, not built. In April, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, described the disappearance of Christians from the Middle East as "a possibility that appalls me." Iran this week sentenced seven Bahái leaders, merely for being Baháis.

These are national policies, not merely "extremist" Islam. This is directly linked to why the West, including lower Manhattan, is being attacked.

It's always stirring to see the American Constitution prevail on behalf of unpopular groups, whether neo-Nazis marching in Skokie or Imam Rauf's Cordoba House in New York. But here's what's galling about the Cordoba House affair. There is a sense in which these unpopular causes and people always free-ride on the rest of us who defend freedom. It would be good to see them in return doing their part to keep these principles alive, and that includes Imam Rauf's unambiguous public support for the embattled Christian minorities in the Middle East.

Islam isn't just another religion in America. It is bound up in the biggest political struggle of our time. Notwithstanding Imam Rauf's commitments to "dialogue," what has he or the rest done to promote and protect the traditions of Western civil society, for which many here and in Europe have fought and died? Maybe the Constitution doesn't explicitly require it, but where is the good faith on their part?

No institution has spent more time trying to bring Islam toward the modern world's tradition of civil liberties—that is, the world as we've known it for about 250 years—than the Vatican. On behalf of tolerance in the Middle Eastern countries, the Vatican has set up active directorates, sent envoys and held endless symposia on behalf of "understanding" and "dialogue."

In 1995, the Saudis and others, with the Vatican's support, opened a large, beautiful mosque in Rome. The expectation was that the Saudis would loosen their restrictions on Christian practice. Despite some one million immigrant Christian workers there, the Saudis have done nothing.

Frustrated by the repeated failure of Islamic leaders to match promises with practice, Pope Benedict added to the Vatican's strategy of accommodation a one-word policy, which the tolerance advocates here should adopt: "reciprocity."

The idea: There will be support for fewer new mosques in the West until the home countries stop hammering non-Islamic religions. Until they reciprocate good will with good will.

Imam Rauf and his partners are getting more than they've earned. That's nice. But even in tolerant America, political life isn't a one-way street. Islam is in political tension with the world over Islamic terror. The next time one of them tries to blow up New York, let's hope the TV cameras' first stop for a denunciation won't be the mayor, but the front steps of Cordoba House.

About Daniel Henninger
Daniel Henninger is deputy editor of The Wall Street Journal's editorial page. Mr. Henninger joined Dow Jones in 1971 as a staff writer for the National Observer. He became an editorial-page writer for the Journal in 1977, arts editor in 1978 and editorial features editor in 1980. He was appointed assistant editor of the editorial page in 1983 and chief editorial writer and senior assistant editor in October 1986, with daily responsibility for the "Review & Outlook" columns. In November 1989 he became deputy editor of the editorial page.

Mr. Henninger was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in editorial writing in 1987 and 1996, and shared in the Journal's Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for the paper's coverage of the attacks on September 11. In 2004, he won the Eric Breindel Journalism Award for his "Wonder Land" column.


WSJ

1 comment:

trencherbone said...

The Muslims have made a major tactical blunder with the Ground Zero Victory Mosque, and we Islamically-aware counterjihadists need to use it and strike while the iron is hot. The Muslim grand strategy requires incremental creeping Sharia and supremacism, where Islam insidiously takes over and slowly destroys Western civilization by a thousand cuts. Every advance should be so small that the 'najis kafir sons of pigs and monkeys' (that's us, folks!) either don't notice it, or can't be bothered to oppose such a minor irritation.

But this abomination has half awoken the sleeping giant of American Public Opinion. We need to keep prodding the giant to prevent him falling back to sleep, and hopefully get him to awake fully. To do this we need to spread our message beyond the counter-jihadist blogosphere, using local media and social networks etc.

We also need to link the Mosque issue to the general problems of Islamic supremacism in as many ways as possible, a full list of topics can be found here.

A particular example that most Americans will be unaware of is the Islamic motivation for the Beslan child-rape orgy and massacre, the sixth anniversary of which approaches. The MSM went to great lengths to cover up both the vileness of the sexual tortures, and the Muslim involvement and Islamic doctrinal basis of this attack on kafir children

Although Beslan did not produce the greatest number of casualties of the current jihad, it exceeds all others in its sadism and depravity, and graphically illustrates what we have allowed into the West. Please ensure through your blogs and forums that the anniversary of Beslan is not forgotten this year.